Neck pillow
Exhibition view
Neck pillow
Exhibition view
Untitled (Pencil), 2016
Dave HARDY
Untitled (Pencil), 2016
polyurethane foam, aluminum, glass, cement, tint, ink, clay, pencil
15.5 x 11.5 x 6 inches
Unique artwork
Six, 2016
Dave HARDY
Six, 2016
polyurethane foam, glass, cement, tint, wax paper, tape, glue stick, coconuts
59.5 x 16 x14 inches
Unique artwork
Blue wall, 2017
Dave HARDY
Blue wall, 2017
cement, polyurethane foam, aluminum, glass, tint, paint, wood, pencil
12.5L x 4.5W x 17H inches
Unique artwork
Chock, 2016
Dave HARDY
Chock, 2016
polyurethane foam, glass, cement, tape, ink, rubber chock
51.5 x 21 x12 inches
Unique artwork
Blue Back, 2016
Dave HARDY
Blue Back, 2016
polyurethane foam, glass, cement, aluminum, paint, tint, plasticine, ink, markers, pen, wood
37.5 x 20 x 11 inches
Unique artwork
Cernuous, 2017
Dave HARDY
Cernuous, 2017
cement, polyurethane foam, aluminum, glass, tint, paint, wood, pencils, pens, pretzel, CA glue, gum package
37 x 34 x 7 inches
Unique artwork

Neck pillow

27.04.2017 - 27.05.2017

Main space

Download exhibition press release


Dave Hardy’s sculptures proceed from the abstract assembly of salvaged industrial materials (polyurethane foam, glass plates, metal  bars) and  heteroclite  objects  (pens,  modeling  clay, pretzels, coconuts...). Closely interlocked,  these  elements compose  autonomous structures of various sizes that seem to override  the  basic  principles  of  balance  and  gravity with the grandiloquence of impossible  shapes.  Following  game  rules  dictated  by contradictions, Dave Hardy’s  works  present  their  visual aberration after a thorough exploration of matter, a set of gestures  designed  to  hold  together  elements  that  theoretically have nothing in common, or almost nothing. A large part of his practice is based on a process made  invisible. Engaged  in  an  intense  body-to-body  struggle, Dave Hardy saturates  the  foam  in cement; gorged with medium it is then kneaded, manipulated into  voluptuous  folds, wooden exoskeletons holding them in place before they are removed. Glass plates and objects are then pressed onto and inserted into the matter as it  rigidifies, thus stabilizing the whole.

Excerpt from the press release written by Marie Chênel